Digital technologies – Bizim Kasa http://bizimkasa.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 04:33:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bizimkasa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-56-150x150.png Digital technologies – Bizim Kasa http://bizimkasa.com/ 32 32 ‘Dark data’ is killing the planet – we need digital decarbonization https://bizimkasa.com/dark-data-is-killing-the-planet-we-need-digital-decarbonization/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 04:33:02 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/dark-data-is-killing-the-planet-we-need-digital-decarbonization/ More than half of the digital data generated by companies is collected, processed and stored for one-time use. Often it is never reused. It could be your multiple, almost identical images kept in Google Photos or iCloud, outdated spreadsheets from a company that will never be used again, or data from sensors in the […]]]>

More than half of the digital data generated by companies is collected, processed and stored for one-time use. Often it is never reused. It could be your multiple, almost identical images kept in Google Photos or iCloud, outdated spreadsheets from a company that will never be used again, or data from sensors in the Internet of Things that have no aim.

These “dark data” are anchored to the real world by the energy they require. Even data that is stored and never used again takes up space on servers – usually huge banks of computers in warehouses. These computers and warehouses consume a lot of electricity.

This is a significant energy cost that is hidden in most organizations. Maintaining an effective organizational memory is a challenge, but at what cost for the environment? In the movement towards net zero, many organizations are trying to reduce their carbon footprint. Guidance has generally focused on reducing traditional sources of carbon production, through mechanisms such as carbon offsetting via third parties (planting trees to offset emissions from gasoline use, for example).

A digital carbon footprint While most climate change activists focus on limiting emissions from the automotive, aerospace and energy industries, digital data processing is already comparable to these sectors and continues to grow. In 2020, digitization was expected to generate 4% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

The production of digital data is growing rapidly – ​​this year the world is expected to generate 97 zettabytes (i.e. 97 trillion gigabytes) of data. By 2025, it could nearly double to 181 zettabytes. It is therefore surprising that little political attention has been paid to reducing the digital carbon footprint of organisations.

When we talk to people about our work, we find that they often assume that digital data, and indeed the digitization process, is carbon neutral. But that’s not necessarily the case – we control its carbon footprint for better or for worse. To help reduce this footprint, we have introduced the notion of “digital decarbonization”.

By this we do not mean the use of phones, computers, sensors and other digital technologies to reduce an organization’s carbon footprint. Rather, we are referring to reducing the carbon footprint of the digital data itself. It is essential to recognize that digitalization is not in itself an environmental problem, but that there are huge environmental impacts that depend on how we use digital processes in daily work activities.

To illustrate the magnitude of the dark data situation, data centers (responsible for 2.5% of all human-made carbon dioxide) have a larger carbon footprint than the aviation industry (2.1 %). To put this into context, we’ve created a tool that can help calculate the carbon cost of data to an organization.

Using our calculations, a typical data-driven business, such as insurance, retail, or banking, with 100 employees, could generate 2,983 gigabytes of dark data per day. If they were to keep that data for a year, that data would have a carbon footprint similar to flying six times from London to New York.

Currently, companies produce 1,300,000,000 gigabytes of dark data per day, or 3,023,255 flights from London to New York.

The rapid growth of dark data raises important questions about the effectiveness of current digital practices. In research recently published in the Journal of Business Strategy, we identified ways to help organizations reuse digital data and highlighted pathways for organizations to take when collecting, processing and storing new digital data. We hope this can reduce the production of dark data and contribute to the digital decarbonization movement, which we will all need to commit to if we are to achieve net zero.

You can even start yourself by deciding which photos and videos you no longer need. Every file stored on Apple iCloud or Google Photos adds to your digital carbon footprint.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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A mantra for successful supply chains https://bizimkasa.com/a-mantra-for-successful-supply-chains/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 05:25:26 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/a-mantra-for-successful-supply-chains/ Supply chain disruptions during the pandemic-induced lockdown and its impact on businesses in general and the economy as a whole are still fresh in our minds. Although experts believe they could not have done anything differently, as the sheer force of the spread of Covid-19 left no one time to think, let alone act, to […]]]>

Supply chain disruptions during the pandemic-induced lockdown and its impact on businesses in general and the economy as a whole are still fresh in our minds. Although experts believe they could not have done anything differently, as the sheer force of the spread of Covid-19 left no one time to think, let alone act, to avert disaster.

Companies of all shapes and sizes, whether it’s Apple and the delays around iPhones or electric vehicles waiting for their batteries, the industry has been reduced to waiting its turn, which all the chains against efficient supply chains protect themselves. A blog post by IBM highlights a recent potential railroad strike in the United States and how it could have worsened the already strained supply chain. Here are some excerpts from the post:

As supply chain managers (CSCOs) walk a tightrope in the face of potential disaster, their steps are far from hesitant. A new report from the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) collects insights from 1,500 CSCOs surveyed. According to the report, CSCOs help their organizations differentiate and create competitive advantage by using data and AI to improve their supply chains. And this competitive advantage drives profitability and increased revenue relative to their peers.

Smart investments offer clear benefits

Companies that align their digital transformation and sustainability agendas achieve 20% higher revenue growth than their peers, the report finds. CSCOs see a clear competitive advantage from these investments, both from a revenue and bottom line perspective. They also obtain a differentiated proposal to attract the best permanent talents and young professional talents.

More than half of surveyed CSCOs are accelerating their investments in digital technologies, including increasing automation and digitization of physical and asset-based processes. 48% apply open innovation with business partners, 46% explore new risk models, and 54% take a cutting-edge approach to data-driven innovation, including using predictive approaches and implementing flows technology-infused workplaces.

Take for example the Applied Science and Technology Research Institute of Hong Kong Company Limited (ASTRI). This R&D center for information and communication technology is responsible for promoting Hong Kong’s competitiveness in technology-based industries. As part of its mission, ASTRI helps manufacturers to shorten their time to market, reduce their development costs and improve the quality of their products.

ASTRI has developed a digital twin approach to equipment development. By implementing a science-based agile approach to designing smarter manufacturing equipment, leveraging smart workflows between assets throughout the extended production process, and using requirements-driven analysis and design based on a template, the organization creates a digital twin of a piece of equipment. This allows engineers to perform a wide range of simulations and tests at nominal incremental cost to identify potential design flaws earlier in the cycle. This model-based method also allows earlier validation of customer requirements.

ASTRI estimates that the twin approach reduced integration time by 40% and total development cost by 30%. Additionally, the use of robotic automation, IoT sensor integration, and digital twin modeling for predictive maintenance supports 24/7 plant availability.

IInnovators outpace the competition

Through these transformational technology investments, CSCOs are managing their supply chains to drive powerful results. They are strengthening their technology strategies and adopting a data-driven innovation approach that emphasizes scaling hybrid cloud infrastructure, AI-enabled workflows, customer-driven sustainability client and a deeper focus on cybersecurity. These CSCOs make up the top 20% of respondents, also known as “the innovators”.

Innovators are ahead of other CSCOs in embracing digital transformation. They use hybrid cloud platforms 60% of the time, compared to 49% among their competitors. Innovators are also leading the field with a digital infrastructure that allows investments in new technologies to scale efficiently and create value. They use AI digitization and automation 81% more than their peers. 90% of innovators use AI and advanced analytics in demand management and predictive forecasting, 18% more than their peers.

The findings underscore the importance of innovative CSCOs that prioritize digitization for effective end-to-end visibility and momentum. In short, if you want to increase performance and value, data-driven innovation is your path.

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Changing habits, technology drives online habits https://bizimkasa.com/changing-habits-technology-drives-online-habits/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 23:59:00 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/changing-habits-technology-drives-online-habits/ Against this backdrop, The Australian Financial Review recently co-hosted the Digital Commerce Surge Roundtable with financial services giant Visa to discuss the growth of digital commerce and the evolution of businesses and consumers in the digital age. Speaking at the roundtable, Visa Group Country Director for Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific, Julian Potter, […]]]>

Against this backdrop, The Australian Financial Review recently co-hosted the Digital Commerce Surge Roundtable with financial services giant Visa to discuss the growth of digital commerce and the evolution of businesses and consumers in the digital age.

Speaking at the roundtable, Visa Group Country Director for Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific, Julian Potter, said he remained optimistic as technology makes the world smaller.

Visa Group Country Director for Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific, Julian Potter. Jeremy Piper

“It puts more things within reach of more people,” he said. “Typically, a small or micro business would serve people coming to their premises and now they can be open for business 24/7 and they can ship their goods and services and accept payments online.

Technology has transformed the way we interact not only with our own employees, but also with our customers, whether large entities such as Visa or small and medium-sized businesses.

Specifically, the exponential growth of digital commerce shows no signs of slowing, even as consumers return to physical stores post-pandemic. The reason for this is that as we become more connected, the more things we can access online – whether it’s shopping, streaming entertainment, or accessing services ranging from healthcare to local government.

“In fact, according to Euromonitor, digital commerce will be worth around $2 trillion per year in the Asia-Pacific region by 2025,” Potter said.

Ciyi Lim, another panellist, said the pandemic had caused people to go online because they couldn’t go out, but even though society is opening up again, they have stayed online. Lim, who leads innovation for Visa in the Asia-Pacific region, said with more and more people migrating online, our relationship with the digital world is changing rapidly.

“In the early 90s, with Web1, the static web, it was really a one-way library, where we went online and read the information that was published,” she said. “Now we are at or near the pinnacle of the Web2 or Social Web where platforms, marketplaces and social networks, like Google, Meta, Airbnb and more, sit in the middle of two-way networks managing and monetizing data and contents.”

Ciyi Lim, Head of Innovation, Asia-Pacific, Visa. Jeremy Piper

And what we’ve learned with Web2 is the power of data and how it can be used to hyper-personalize the customer experience.

For Lim, this powerful stream of data has been mostly controlled by tech behemoths like Google, Amazon and Meta, but that’s slowly changing as we “see the green shoots of Web3 emerging where there’s a pattern shift.” centralized to a more distributed model”. .

“A place where the user can take control of their content and data and we are doing this through new technologies such as distributed ledgers, blockchain and smart contracts,” Lim said.

Mark Hansell, panellist and chief product officer of digital financial services provider Shaype, said technology has enabled the world to

payments and the transfer of value to democratize.

“Barriers to entry into the payments space have fallen significantly over the past 10 years, primarily due to technology and new emerging technologies. Right now you can count the ways to move money on a hand, but as we go this is going to multiply exponentially. »

Hansell said the end customer does not care how they pay for their goods or services, whether in fiat currency like the Australian dollar or a digital currency. The current challenge was transfer between ecosystems. “As e-commerce evolves, we’ll see conversion happen seamlessly behind the scenes with integration partners like Shaype.”

CEO and founder of data aggregation platform Basiq, Damir Cuca, is excited about the potential of open banking as it gives consumers the ability to share their financial data with any third party.

He says each bank now had to open up the data it had about consumers and, if a consumer consented, share that data with a third party.

“It’s incredibly revolutionary because our bank accounts actually leave traces of exactly what we like, our preferences and all that.”

Visa’s Lim said the future of digital commerce comes down to three main trends: the continued explosion of digital connections and the blurring of the physical and online worlds; the availability of data not only for personalization but also in a predictive sense so that business activity becomes more transparent in our daily lives; and the emergence of Web3 and an explosion of (digital) goods that we are not even aware of yet.

Yet, Visa’s Potter says that to achieve this, businesses will need to truly embrace the concept of trust in the digital world. “You have to have faith in something before you prepare to open up – that’s going to be critically important as we move forward.”

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A Marriage of Engineering and Public Policy: Return of USC’s Global Space and Deterrence Program – USC Viterbi https://bizimkasa.com/a-marriage-of-engineering-and-public-policy-return-of-uscs-global-space-and-deterrence-program-usc-viterbi/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:53:56 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/a-marriage-of-engineering-and-public-policy-return-of-uscs-global-space-and-deterrence-program-usc-viterbi/ The USC SHIELD Executive Program in Global Space and Deterrence began at USC on September 15, 2022 with its second class of senior military, government, and industry security experts. (Photo/Tom Queally) For Kenneth Michel, military threats to the security of the world’s democracies have only intensified over the past five to ten years, particularly from […]]]>

The USC SHIELD Executive Program in Global Space and Deterrence began at USC on September 15, 2022 with its second class of senior military, government, and industry security experts. (Photo/Tom Queally)

For Kenneth Michel, military threats to the security of the world’s democracies have only intensified over the past five to ten years, particularly from ever-improving ballistic and other missiles.

That’s why Michel, an operations officer who works in the US Indo-Pacific Command’s Strategy and Policy Directorate in Honolulu, recently flew from Hawaii to Southern California to participate in the training session. opening of the USC SHIELD Executive Program on Global Space and Deterrence.

From September 15-17, Michel and more than 20 other top military, government, and industry experts gathered at USC for the launch of USC SHIELD. The eight-month program aims to teach U.S. leaders and others to understand how to tackle growing national security issues while bridging bureaucratic gaps between politics and new technical innovations.

Michel said he looks forward to collaborating and connecting with other leaders on security issues and learning from them.

“As someone who works in the policy store, I think it’s important to acquire [new] perspectives on missile defense,” said Michel. “That’s great [USC SHIELD] brings together a lot of people – not just the military, but academics, members of government and other fields to discuss the problem of missile defense, which is particularly relevant in today’s times given potential conflict zones.

Drew Hirsekorn, technical director of Lockheed Martin based in Morristown, New Jersey, agreed. “Collaborating with and getting insights from people from different organizations, who are experts in other areas, would be very beneficial for me to have different ideas and tools,” said Hirsekorn, who provides a capacity for ballistic missile defense to naval platforms.

Over the next few months, 23 participants from the United States and Canada will take blended courses taught by faculty from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, in partnership with Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance (MDAA). They will explore topics ranging from organizational behavior to how to avoid common mistakes in engineering assessment, from the essentials of inventive thinking to a case study of the first interception of a long-range ballistic missile in 1961. .

Two three-day sessions will be held in person at USC and one will be held in Washington D.C. Additionally, site visits are planned for Vandenberg Space Force Base and Space Systems Command at the Force Base Los Angeles Space.

As part of USC SHIELD, participants must write and present a group capstone project. Upon completion of the program, students will receive a USC Continuing Education Certificate.

Riki Ellison, who graduated from USC Dornsife in 1983;  Founder and Chairman of the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance (MDAA);  and three-time Super Bowl champion with the San Francisco 49ers in 1985, 1989 and 1990, played a vital role in the creation of USC SHIELD (Photo/Tom Queally)

Riki Ellison, who graduated from USC Dornsife in 1983; Founder and Chairman of the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance (MDAA); and three-time Super Bowl champion with the San Francisco 49ers in 1985, 1989 and 1990, played a vital role in the creation of USC SHIELD (Photo/Tom Queally)

“We want to create the cutting-edge academic community in the critical thinking of a new deterrent in space that is needed today,” said Riki Ellison, a 1983 USC Dornsife graduate; founder and president of MDAA; and three-time Super Bowl champion with the San Francisco 49ers in 1985, 1989, and 1990. “We strive for educational and academic excellence in an area no one else focuses on.”

Members of this year’s class are drawn from the US Space Force, US Space Systems Command, Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, INDOPACOM, NORTHCOM, SPACECOM, STRATCOM, Canada, Missile Defense Agency and industry.

Frank Zerunyan, professor of governance practice at the Price School, said the creation of USC SHIELD reflects the university’s longstanding support of the armed forces.

“Our relationship with the US military goes back more than a century,” said Zerunyan, who is also a director and academic liaison for USC ROTC and nautical science programs. “We develop the leaders of tomorrow in our elite ROTC programs and, in this program, interact with the leaders of today to improve missile defense and deterrence policy and innovation.”

Neil Siegel, IBM Professor of Engineering Management at USC Viterbi, will teach five of USC SHIELD’s 15 lectures this year, including risk management and problem solving. Siegel, a member of the National Academy of Engineering who came to USC after a long career as a vice president at Northrop Grumman, said adult learning is one way the university can help the society.

“That kind of industry and government outreach is part of the university’s mission,” Siegel said. “USC has had an adult education component for at least 50 years.”

Launching in 2021, USC SHIELD will be even stronger this year, said Candace House Teixeira, associate dean of corporate engagement and programs. She said feedback from the inaugural class led to the addition of lessons on big data and digital technologies, among other topics.

“We took feedback from our impressive first cohort and refined the program with leadership from our faculty members and partners at MDAA,” she said. “It is now a more mature program that continues to develop leaders in the field of global space and deterrence. I am thrilled for this year’s cohort and for the future.

Posted on September 23, 2022

Last updated September 23, 2022

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Using Data and Digital for Health in Challenging Operating Environments – Global https://bizimkasa.com/using-data-and-digital-for-health-in-challenging-operating-environments-global/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:46:46 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/using-data-and-digital-for-health-in-challenging-operating-environments-global/ Digital and data tools are revolutionizing healthcare systems in countries around the world. Their impact in Challenging Operating Environments (COE), in particular, has transformative potential – overcoming the challenges that have impeded consistent access to health services for millions of vulnerable people. Although they are home to less than 14% of the world’s population, centers […]]]>

Digital and data tools are revolutionizing healthcare systems in countries around the world. Their impact in Challenging Operating Environments (COE), in particular, has transformative potential – overcoming the challenges that have impeded consistent access to health services for millions of vulnerable people.

Although they are home to less than 14% of the world’s population, centers of excellence account for approximately one third of the global burden of disease related to HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria. The intertwined crises facing the world today – the COVID-19 pandemic, hunger, conflict and the climate crisis – all have enormous health impacts. The World Health Organization reports that health systems in all regions and in countries at all income levels are severely affected, with little or no improvement since 2021. These worsening crises could continue to reverse gains. hard won in the fight against poverty, infectious diseases and inequalities, especially in the centers of excellence. But they also offer an opportunity to do things differently, using new tools and flexible approaches to deliver health services to the most vulnerable.

Digital Innovations for Centers of Excellence

The challenge

Timely and accurate data are the cornerstone of effective health systems. However, collecting data at centers of excellence – and delivering care – means facing barriers to accessing remote areas and hard-to-reach populations, limited institutional capacity, and a shortage of resources. already overworked health workers, among other factors.

When data is collected by hand, records must be transported to public health facilities in major cities for analysis. Long distances and difficult terrain can slow this process, delaying health services for vulnerable populations.

Additionally, managing supply chains for the distribution of diagnostics, medicines, and other health products can be time consuming when done by hand – and is more likely to be inaccurate. Ineffective supply management systems can lead to drug stock-outs, expiring tests on shelves, or shipments arriving too late for hard-to-reach people.

The solution

Access to quality data to make informed and timely decisions is essential to help frontline health workers improve service delivery to vulnerable people. People-centered digital tools, when implemented equitably, can enable reliable, real-time surveillance of outbreaks, support prevention and treatment efforts, and empower community health workers and others to do their jobs more effectively and provide health services to populations in need.

Digital tools have great potential to increase access, as seen with the use of telemedicine and other digital health technologies in response to COVID-19.

Feature Stories: Digital Technology and Data Solutions in Guinea-Bissau, Chad and Afghanistan

Supporting real-time health surveillance in Guinea-Bissau

Prior to digitization, health data in Guinea-Bissau was collected through a paper-based system and physically shipped to the National Institute of Public Health in the capital, miles away through flood-prone terrain.

“It took about two to three weeks between collecting and analyzing the local data,” says Herculano Bras da Silva, health worker. This has made it nearly impossible to monitor malaria outbreaks in real time and respond in a timely manner.

In 2018, UNDP began working with partners in Guinea-Bissau to adapt the country’s District Health Information Software (DHIS) to support malaria data collection. To put the software in the hands of community health workers, UNDP and the Global Fund, with support from the World Bank, distributed mobile devices to record and transmit data, and trained community health workers in their use. use.

This digitization of health data has strengthened the national government’s ability to map and track malaria outbreaks in real time, improving response times. Live surveillance of new malaria cases is now routine in nearly 150 health facilities across the country of 2 million people. Problems can be detected quickly: for example, if the data transmitted in real time shows that a woman visited a health facility during her pregnancy but did not receive a mosquito net or preventive treatment against malaria such as expected, it could mean that the health facility has temporarily run out of stock. This can be quickly investigated and corrected by reallocating stock from neighboring facilities. This work is ongoing – in the first six months of 2022 alone, almost half a million people were tested for malaria and 50,000 people received treatment.

Increasing Efficiency and Improving Supply Chain Management in Chad

Malaria is the leading cause of death among children under five in Chad. More than a million children are eligible to receive preventive treatment, but treatment distribution is often delayed by a health information system that requires workers to manually record data. This system made it difficult to assess the number of eligible children living in a community, track those who had received treatment, and determine which communities to prioritize in the event of an outbreak.

Starting in early 2022, UNDP supported the digitalization of the malaria prevention program in Chad, helping to train more than 1,300 community health workers in 13 health districts and 184 health facilities on digital data collection in the country. first phase of implementation.

“The main advantage of digitization… is that it allows us to control the data sent in real time at all levels,” explains Zachée Mbayam, malaria focal point for the health district of Kouloudia in the Lac province. When distributing scarce resources, every treat counts, so avoiding discrepancies in records is essential. With digitization, “everything is centralized, we detect errors very quickly and we can correct them in real time”.

During the first phase of the initiative, more than 200,000 children were reached. The pilot also provided important lessons that carried over into the second phase, such as creating instant messaging groups to help with troubleshooting and sharing tips.

Building on these lessons, UNDP will scale up the use of digital tools for malaria prevention and treatment in 2023 to improve inventory management and mass distribution of bed nets. This has the potential to reach nearly 19 million people.

Preparing healthcare workers for success in Afghanistan

Internet connectivity, electricity and other utilities can be scarce throughout Afghanistan. This presents additional challenges when using digital health tools.

UNDP, together with the Global Fund, supported the digitization of the National Malaria Control Program in Afghanistan. This required working with partners to design software that works offline and then pushes data to the central database when internet connectivity resumes. All provincial malaria focal points have been trained and equipped with mobile devices, and the new surveillance system has been rolled out nationwide. Another digital solution to meet the specific needs of the community is Afghanistan’s first mobile money system, HesabPay, which guarantees the timely payment of healthcare workers.

Digital technologies and tools are the future of centers of excellence

To end HIV, TB and malaria as public health threats, we must reach the most vulnerable people with prevention and treatment services, wherever they are. This is particularly important in centers of excellence, where innovative and flexible solutions are needed to address existing weaknesses and adapt to rapidly changing contexts. Digital and data solutions can play a critical role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of health services and increasing access to health services for hard-to-reach populations.

Through its partnership with the Global Fund, governments, civil society and others, UNDP helps countries implement digital tools that address their unique challenges and improve the health of their citizens. In Afghanistan, UNDP is supporting the expansion of the digital monitoring and evaluation program to also track TB. In Guinea-Bissau, work is underway to increase the number of community health workers using digital devices.

The UNDP-Global Fund partnership helps countries build sustainable health systems that can withstand shocks and crises and make progress against the three diseases. The Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment is an important opportunity to scale digital and data solutions for more resilient health systems.

In accordance with UNDP recommendations Strategic Plan 2022-2025 and his HIV, health and development strategy, UNDP partners with the Global Fund, governments and civil society to support and strengthen multi-sectoral national responses to malaria, providing integrated support for policy, program and capacity development. To date, 7.3 million lives have been saved, 1.5 million people are currently receiving HIV treatment; 96 million people treated for malaria; 1 million cases of tuberculosis detected and people put on treatment; greater than 1.1. million health workers trained to support COVID-19 responses.

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Adopting the right educational technology can break down barriers to learning and create impact at scale:M. Shourie Chatterji, Digital Director, Schoolnet India https://bizimkasa.com/adopting-the-right-educational-technology-can-break-down-barriers-to-learning-and-create-impact-at-scalem-shourie-chatterji-digital-director-schoolnet-india/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 07:33:56 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/adopting-the-right-educational-technology-can-break-down-barriers-to-learning-and-create-impact-at-scalem-shourie-chatterji-digital-director-schoolnet-india/ 1. Edtech as a whole is more than just learning apps. Can you please expand on what edtech encompasses from an infrastructure perspective? EdTech is more than just learning apps. Schoolnet has pioneered the use of technology in education since its inception in 1997, when we pioneered the problem of digital divide and low engagement […]]]>

1. Edtech as a whole is more than just learning apps. Can you please expand on what edtech encompasses from an infrastructure perspective?

EdTech is more than just learning apps. Schoolnet has pioneered the use of technology in education since its inception in 1997, when we pioneered the problem of digital divide and low engagement in schools. EdTech encompasses both hardware and software, in terms of infrastructure, and also includes teacher training, skills development, digital literacy, and other softer elements. Digital classrooms that include projectors, computers, video conferencing, audio systems, multimedia and multi-sensory content, and analytics to track learner progress are also part of the EdTech sphere. Our patented device, K-Yan*, is a portable 6-in-1 educational device that combines all of these aspects in a single package. In addition, EdTech also includes custom learning solutions, software enabling text-to-speech and vice-versa, live teaching, distance learning, MOOCs and much more.

*KYAN: KYAN is the world’s first interactive, affordable and easy-to-use 6-in-one teaching-learning device. It is designed, developed and patented jointly by Schoolnet India Limited and IIT Bombay. It was commercialized in 2007 by Schoolnet and has now gone mainstream, achieving significant scale, reach and impact in education and training.

2. In a phygital learning environment, how are AI-powered products changing the face of classrooms in India?

AI/ML powered products can bring personalization to teaching and learning. Through a blended learning model, teachers can use technology to improve their classroom effectiveness and students can access high-quality digital learning materials and after-school assessments. Known as the “flipped classroom” method, students can do their learning at home and focus on conceptual clarification and higher-order skill development in the classroom. This not only provides a continuum of learning for students, but through tools such as intelligent instructional insights that lead to adaptive section, assessments, and assignment customization, it will provide teachers with detailed, real-time information. about each student and their areas of need. This will save the teacher time, allow for a more personalized teaching method and result in increased learning outcomes. It is a unique “phygital” (physical + digital) approach combining the benefits of traditional learning with online learning to create a blended ecosystem, which can drive adoption and personalization of education on a large scale through technology.

Based on the constructivist and mixed approach (a combination of the principles adopted by Piaget and Vygotsky), Schoolnet has developed a personalized learning application, Geneo. Geneo offers multimodal learning options to a child. It combines self-study with AI-assisted learning with virtual mentor support and live tutoring. Its differentiated learning strategy allows each student to learn on its unique guided learning journey combining four key elements – learning, application of concepts, review and assessments. A unique consumer-centric, AI-powered personalized learning platform, Geneo is available both in-school for the teacher and after-school for the students. Since its launch, we have integrated more than 0.8 million users on Geneo.

3. How has the digital learning landscape in India changed over the past two years?

The past two years have been extremely difficult for schools, teachers, parents and students. Most of the over 250 million students in India have not been exposed to distance learning through technology. While 30% of them may have been exposed to digital infrastructure within the classroom, with massive regional and socio-economic variation, this has rarely extended to home learning. It was a massive learning curve when teachers had to get up to speed on digital pedagogy, parents shelled out money to buy smartphones to avoid disruptions in student learning, and students had to get used to learning through an isolated screen. The opportunity that presented itself with it, however, propelled us as a country into a tech-savvy population. Additionally, the EdTech market has seen a huge boom with over $5 billion invested. In 2022, as schools began to reopen, the industry saw some market corrections. Schoolnet has always believed in the power of technology to democratize education, but we believe that the teacher and the school are at the center of the educational process. We believe in working with schools rather than in spite of them. The past two years have reinforced our resolve to create holistic digital classrooms in public schools and affordable private schools, which also include a teacher training program. Additionally, we have witnessed a huge demand to synchronize in-school and after-school learning to avoid disruptions. In 2018, we developed a personalized learning solution for students, Geneo, to maintain learning continuity after school. During the pandemic, we launched live lessons on the app to ensure students can receive any additional help needed, as well as expanded video conferencing on KYAN for teachers to conduct remote and blended learning.

Geneo, a flexible and affordable online learning platform, is available both in school and after school. Geneo uses the digitized version of the school textbook, coupled with a plethora of multi-sensory learning content to promote high engagement and application. It is supported by continuous assessments to help identify a child’s current learning state and provides a unique learning path (curated by an artificial intelligence algorithm) to reach the desired state. It also comes with supportive teachers/mentors, available through live lessons and chat. It is currently available for VI-X classes in English and Hindi for CBSE, and Bengali for West Bengal Board students.

4. What are the ways in which the digital divide that exists in rural India can be bridged?

Adopting the right educational technology can break down barriers to learning and create large-scale impact, especially for those at the middle and bottom of the economic pyramid. However, several challenges hinder the widespread adoption of EdTech:

  • Digital divide with 70% of schools lacking digital infrastructure, including limited availability of multi-sensory and localized curriculum-aligned content.
  • Lack of personal devices: more than 40% of schoolchildren do not have access to a smartphone
  • Insufficient capacity of teachers in the adoption of digital pedagogy
  • Absence of affordable Personalized and Adaptive Learning (PAL) solutions: most additional EdTech solution providers serve the top of the pyramid

The NEP 2020 and PM SHRI program point to a striking opportunity to equip schools with modern digital technologies to prepare them and their students for the future while bridging the growing digital divide. Our solution includes our patented “K-Yan” smart and versatile teaching device as well as Google Chromebooks as student-shareable learning devices, combined with multi-sensory content relevant to the school curriculum. It also comes with a teaching and learning management system with analytical teacher training and associated change management support services to drive adoption of ed-tech in schools. public and private affordable (APS). We have already established our presence in over 100,000 schools in India through such solutions.

In addition, families further increased their spending on further education to reach 41% of their total education spending. With more than 65% of families having a smartphone, the access problem is on the way to being solved. But the problem of quality and substandard learning outcomes remains. To improve a child’s learning outcomes, it is important to assess each learner’s current state, identify learning gaps, and provide a unique path to reach the desired state. Geneo addresses this concern through AI/ML, then creates a unique learning path for each student. Additionally, content is mapped to NCERT textbooks by chapter and page, allowing the student to stay connected to what they have studied in class.

5. How do you see technology evolving in education over the next few years?

Technology now has an indisputable role to play in education. We see it becoming more relevant and more democratized if it is integrated into the school ecosystem. Beyond all that we mentioned above – digital classrooms, multimedia and multi-sensory content, analytics, teacher training, device access, personalized and adaptive learning and remote learning, there are new technologies like the ‘AR/VR gaining popularity, Delhi government launched the first-ever virtual school, and blended learning is becoming the new norm. We’re also working to expand the reach of EdTech by developing media content and apps in vernacular languages ​​aligned with state guidance, making it affordable, and incorporating elements of gamification as well as new skills like coding. NEP 2020 has given impetus to the integration of technology in education and various governments are keen to move forward. Portals like DIKSHA, e-Pathshala, G-Shala, etc. are under construction and now the PM SHRI schools have also been announced. We envision technology being used wisely to democratize quality education at scale, resulting in achieving grade-specific learning outcomes and maximizing the efficiency and effectiveness of education. ‘education.

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Dr. Al-Sheikh: Advanced technologies provide efficient and equitable access to platforms for learners https://bizimkasa.com/dr-al-sheikh-advanced-technologies-provide-efficient-and-equitable-access-to-platforms-for-learners/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:25:22 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/dr-al-sheikh-advanced-technologies-provide-efficient-and-equitable-access-to-platforms-for-learners/ NEW YORK – Education Minister Dr. Hamad Bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh said that “advanced technologies provide efficient, equitable and comprehensive access to open electronic resources and platforms for learners with different backgrounds, interests and different needs at any time and from anywhere in the world, which can be provided by various outlets such as satellite channels, […]]]>

NEW YORK – Education Minister Dr. Hamad Bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh said that “advanced technologies provide efficient, equitable and comprehensive access to open electronic resources and platforms for learners with different backgrounds, interests and different needs at any time and from anywhere in the world, which can be provided by various outlets such as satellite channels, digital platforms and SMS.

He made the statement during a high-level session titled: Effective Education Ecosystems: Solutions for Open Digital Content, as part of Solutions Day at the Transforming Education Summit in New York, USA. This coincided with the September 13-27 convening of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly.

During the session, the Minister of Education affirmed the importance of open electronic resources and platforms to support and build student capacity, improve teacher skills and facilitate access to materials and resources. high quality teaching.

He highlighted the Kingdom’s distinguished experience in the field of digital transformation since 2005 as well as its efforts during the coronavirus pandemic through the development of educational platforms and investment in digital solutions.

He highlighted the role of the Kingdom’s educational platforms, “My School (Madrasati), My Kindergarten (Rawdati) and Ein Educational Channels”, which have received global attention and provided an inspiring model for education systems around the world by providing fair and efficient services. access to all learners.

Dr. Al-Sheikh added that the Kingdom’s success in open digital resources and platforms emanated from early investments in digital infrastructure and digital education in the Kingdom.

He revealed that the Kingdom is one of the few countries in the world to have an institution dedicated to e-learning policies and setting standards for all electronic and digital educational content, namely the National Center for online learning.

He affirmed the importance of the cycle of open electronic resources and platforms to develop education and increase the sustainability of education systems in times of crisis.

He pointed out that low cost, ease of reuse, compatibility with local contexts and republication reflect the importance of open electronic resources and platforms, noting that students in the Kingdom through these platforms and resources can learn more about the Natural History Museum. here in New York, while they are in their classrooms in Riyadh.

Meanwhile, students here in the United States and around the world can virtually visit NEOM Smart City in the Kingdom.

Previously, Dr. Al-Sheikh participated in the opening session of Solutions Day on Saturday, announcing the launch of his activities and sessions as part of the proceedings of the Transforming Education Summit held in New York.

Ministerial sessions held during the summit provide a forum for global partners to mobilize support to launch or expand initiatives related to the summit themes.

A set of initiatives aimed at obtaining international partnerships and alliances were presented to help transform education with the participation and coordination of Member States and international organizations.

The sessions featured a review of initiatives to transform education across five themes, including the provision of inclusive, equitable, safe and healthy schools, support for learning and life skills, work and sustainable development , teachers and the teaching profession, as well as digital learning and transformation, and education finance.

Education ministers discussed recovering from the loss of education caused by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and getting back on track to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and education-related goals of the 2030 Agenda. — SPA

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The Right Place seeks tech transformation for Grand Rapids https://bizimkasa.com/the-right-place-seeks-tech-transformation-for-grand-rapids/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 19:52:35 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/the-right-place-seeks-tech-transformation-for-grand-rapids/ Grand Rapids could become a major tech hub for the Midwest as an economic development organization seeks to craft a new 10-year strategy. The Right Place Inc. earlier this month shared a report with a vision to grow the technology sector in the greater Grand Rapids area. The strategy foresees the creation of 20,000 new […]]]>

Grand Rapids could become a major tech hub for the Midwest as an economic development organization seeks to craft a new 10-year strategy.

The Right Place Inc. earlier this month shared a report with a vision to grow the technology sector in the greater Grand Rapids area. The strategy foresees the creation of 20,000 new jobs in technology over the next decade, bringing the sector to 10% of all regional jobs.

The strategy is the result of months of intensive research and strategic planning with hundreds of business, academic and community leaders from across the region. The Right Place brought together leaders in the fall of 2021 as part of a technology task force to imagine what it would be like to position Grand Rapids as the Midwest’s own technology hub.

For Randy Thelen, President and CEO of The Right Place, technology is indeed the next big opportunity for the region.

“Our regional businesses are driven by technology,” Thelen said. “Tech hubs have become the modern engines of economic growth, driving advancement and prosperity within their communities…this collaborative plan offers a detailed roadmap to realize our community’s bold vision and make it a reality.”

Led by co-chairs Steve Downing, CEO of Gentex, and Richard Pappas, president of the University of Davenport, the technology working group divided into three committees and engaged in several visioning sessions. Now, the committee’s work has resulted in a series of recommendations for The Right Place’s Board of Directors, as outlined in the 10-Year Strategy.

“A handful of opportunities have really surfaced around talent and innovation, ecosystem and business growth,” said Jennifer Wangler, vice president of technology at The Right Place and executive director of the Technology Council of West Michigan.

To achieve the vision, the plan focuses on these three categories: talent, ecosystem and growth.

On the talent side, increasing the tech talent pool is critical to successfully executing the overall strategy, according to the report. The main objectives are to develop, educate, retrain and attract workers to the sector – starting with the grassroots.

“We recognize that building the pipeline will involve both short-term and long-term vision,” Wangler said. “We’re going to have to work with several different sectors, from K-12 schools through college, as well as boot camps and learning organizations, to create these tech jobs of the future.”

A big part of that will involve raising awareness of the opportunities Grand Rapids has to offer, according to Wangler.

“How do we take those parts of our community that haven’t considered themselves technologists and bring them up to speed?” she says. “How do we look at our K-12 schools and universities to educate, not just students, but also teachers, parents, and administrators?”

Supporting the next generation will allow the region’s strategy and growth to go beyond its ten-year benchmark. The report recommends increased exploration opportunities and exposure to technology careers in area schools, increased corporate support for technology-related programming in the K-12 system, and the creation of a framework for educators to integrate technological skills into classrooms.

The report also lists recommendations for attracting new tech workers to the Grand Rapids area. Tactics include leveraging organizations such as Hello West Michigan to target people with ties to the area, implementing strategic advertising in “brain drain” cities losing employees to the sector, and expanding the reach of local university programs and alumni relations.

Apart from nurturing students and attracting new talent, the strategy recommends retraining and honing existing talent to energize the pipeline. In a 2022 survey by Salesforce, 75% of 23,000 people surveyed in 19 countries said they did not feel ready to operate in a “digital first” world.

Western Michigan could create deployable models for recycling and retraining, partner with big tech companies and build on existing training programs, according to the strategy.

Regarding the 20,000 jobs mentioned in the strategy, Wangler said The Right Place looked at comparable cities to determine what was needed to reach the same levels as other tech hubs.

“We identified other similar communities and looked at their ecosystems and found similarities between our fledgling community here in Grand Rapids and where they were at this starting point,” Wangler said.

For the Grand Rapids ecosystem, the vision sees a cohesive environment in which entrepreneurs, startups, and businesses are empowered to pursue new ideas and scale their businesses.

Specific goals to boost the local tech ecosystem include using events, growing incubators and accelerators, supporting entrepreneurs, increasing density, and expanding broadband service through access Internet accessible and affordable throughout the region.

The report cites a decline in the share of seed and start-up investments in places like California’s Silicon Valley region in 2021, noting that venture capitalists are taking note of these trends and focusing on operations. in small communities.

With the COVID-19 pandemic impacting commercial real estate for the office sector and the overall future of work, the idea of ​​a physical ecosystem seems different than it did in pre- pandemic.

“I think the pandemic has pushed some aspects of technology forward faster,” Wangler said. “What we know in the tech industry is that they’ve always been able to work a little more remotely, a little more agile. But what the pandemic has done is it’s made us taught everyone that there are ways to work differently to be more effective.

Still, the strategy highlights flexible offices, like coworking spaces, as a valuable option for startups to establish a foothold and build physical density in a community. According to the report, Grand Rapids currently has 79,488 square feet of flexible office inventory and adding more physical density to the area can increase the visibility of existing businesses and encourage outside businesses to establish a presence here.

The third category of the report focuses on growth and the opportunity to position Grand Rapids as a place for future technology innovation and digital transformation.

According to the report, the top emerging technologies in the industry in West Michigan right now are cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and machine learning.

To remain competitive, businesses in the region will need to increasingly adopt digital technologies. This specifically relates to manufacturers, who according to Wangler account for 40% of the market in this region while the technology industry currently accounts for 6%.

“It’s important to understand our landscape in western Michigan,” she said. “We’re going to have to converge the technology sector with our other industries, like our manufacturing industry, to help create opportunities for growth both operationally and through product development in technology.”

To do this, the strategy calls for leveraging relationships with local technology companies, finding new ways to support tailored funding, increasing engagement between companies and universities for development and training, and exposing local businesses to new technologies through visits to other technology markets.

Additionally, the 10-year plan will involve an enhanced marketing strategy to highlight West Michigan as a hub for innovation.

For Wangler, the strategy will be a valuable opportunity to generate much-needed buzz for the region.

“We need to start talking about all the cool things happening in West Michigan – all the cool businesses, the great leadership that we have here locally, and the power of collaboration that’s happening in West Michigan that is really unique to our ecosystem,” she says.

“There is a great story to tell.”

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Working together on a resilient basis for the Sustainable Development Goals https://bizimkasa.com/working-together-on-a-resilient-basis-for-the-sustainable-development-goals/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 17:06:02 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/working-together-on-a-resilient-basis-for-the-sustainable-development-goals/ The world is now halfway through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and accelerating the transition from promise to progress has never been more important. In fact, in the 2022 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) report, Secretary-General António Guterres warned that with “cascading and interrelated global crises, stated aspirations…are in jeopardy.” The SDG funding gap was […]]]>

The world is now halfway through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and accelerating the transition from promise to progress has never been more important. In fact, in the 2022 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) report, Secretary-General António Guterres warned that with “cascading and interrelated global crises, stated aspirations…are in jeopardy.” The SDG funding gap was estimated at $2.5 trillion before Covid-19, with an additional $1 trillion needed for Covid-19-related spending in developing countries.

As heads of state gather this week in New York for the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), they face several pressing global challenges. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – ​​set out when the 17 goals were adopted by UN member states in 2015 – remains a cohesive roadmap for action around the world. It establishes a shared vision of the urgent need to work together to improve the well-being of everyone, everywhere, and sustain our planet for the future. It also highlights the role that technology must play in creating a more equitable world.

The 2030 Agenda recognized technology as a “means of implementation” of the SDGs, as well as global partnerships that bring together “governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors” . The report of the UN Secretary-General’s High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation stated: “Of the 17 goals and 169 targets of the SDGs, not a single one is detached from the implications and potential of digital technology. Technology can be a positive force to transform our world and people’s lives when developed and used in a reliable, responsible and inclusive way.

Microsoft has been committed to the SDGs from the start and remains steadfast in its efforts to make them a reality. This is consistent with our history of supporting and promoting the Charter of the United Nations in accordance with our mission: to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. We have engaged with UN agencies to help achieve virtually all of the SDG goals, including our work on connectivity, digital inclusion and humanitarian crises, and our participation in the UN Global Compact since 2006. Microsoft President Brad Smith reiterated the need to “join with governments, industry and civil society on the 17 UN SDGs” when he was named the 2021 SDG Advocate.

Our Microsoft and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals report shares examples of how digital technology, innovation and partnerships are key to advancing the SDGs. For example, we are partnering with UNICEF to advance SDG 4 – “quality education” – through The Learning Passport, a digital platform created to address the challenges of access to quality education faced by millions of children and young people in times of disruption, such as war, crises and displacement. It is a portable education, accessible online, offline and on mobile devices; the platform is now available in 26 countries. To support SDG 8 – “Decent work and economic growth” – Microsoft launched a digital skills initiative in June 2020 to mitigate the impact of Covid-19 on workers around the world; by the end of 2021, 42 million people have acquired essential digital skills through the programs. We’ve also made bold commitments on SDG 13 – “climate action” – including working on the carbon call with the ClimateWorks Foundation, UNEP and over 20 other leading organizations to address reliability and interoperability. carbon accounting for the planet.

But we must do more. Building on Microsoft’s 20 years of collaboration with the UN, a team was created in 2020 to deepen and expand the company’s commitment to the mission of the UN and its agencies, multilateral and regional institutions, development banks, governments, local communities and stakeholders. I am honored to have the opportunity to lead this team for Microsoft as Vice President of United Nations and International Organizations Affairs (UNIO). We aim to help address today’s global challenges and advance the SDGs through the responsible development, deployment and governance of digital technology. This UNIO team will focus on achieving the SDGs and inclusive economic growth; encourage evidence-based policymaking to facilitate digital transformation; and accelerate the adoption of digital technologies to support international systems and their missions.

The scale and complexity of the challenges facing the world today – pandemic recovery, food security and climate change – demand that the world come together in a multilateral effort to leverage our respective knowledge and find innovative solutions. . Throughout my career, I have been involved in multilateral work: seeing Nelson Mandela, accompanied by Graça Machel, tell the G7 finance ministers the urgency of taking action to support development in Africa in 2005, until during my time as Dean of Ambassadors at the OECD. I appreciate the value of multilateral processes – especially when informed by multi-stakeholder insights based on evidence and practical experience – and when they focus on inclusive and sustainable economic development as clear outcomes.

Two issues are central to our work to contribute to the achievement of the SDGs: the critical importance of supporting progress in least developed countries (LDCs) and the need to address issues at the intersection of technology and the society.

LDCs are facing unprecedented challenges related to the Covid-19 pandemic: climate change, global recession, rising energy costs and food insecurity. At the same time, they must foster inclusive, resilient and sustainable recovery and growth. Along with the important role of official development assistance for LDCs, private sector investment will be essential for these countries. We are strengthening our commitments to work with the UN to help expand the reach of its private sector and identify innovative solutions to the most pressing problems with our co-chairing of the 5th UN Conference on the LDC Private Sector Forum in 2023. Doha meetings, we worked with businesses from various sectors to outline key challenges facing LDCs in connectivity, blended finance, skills, multi-stakeholder partnerships and good governance, and provide recommendations on what is needed to drive increased private sector investment for further progress on the SDGs. In close partnership with colleagues at Microsoft Tech for Social Impact, we will continue to deepen our work on empowering UN organizations to appropriately use technology to solve major societal challenges and advance the SDGs, while placing greater emphasis on digital development of LDCs.

For digital technology to provide a resilient foundation for achieving the SDGs, critical issues at the intersection of technology and society will need to be addressed. The industry must work with governments, civil society, the technical community and other stakeholders so that together we can create a trusted digital foundation that can lead to inclusive economic opportunity and protect fundamental human rights – and enable a more environmentally sustainable future. This is an important undertaking for our team – providing the UN, international organizations and governments with perspective on the role of digital technology in achieving the SDGs, while helping to put in place policy frameworks that will promote responsible development and facilitate the systemic adoption of these technologies.

For example, Microsoft participated in the launch of the joint UN and World Bank call to action on the need to invest more in data in April 2022. We highlighted the work of our data scientists to address global challenges, including mitigating the impact of the pandemic, addressing environmental issues, and supporting responses to disasters and other humanitarian crises. We also shared lessons learned from our collaborations on open data and best practices to help bridge the “data divide”. We will continue to work with the UN and the World Bank in their efforts to strengthen data systems and improve the capacities and policies of countries and organizations globally to produce, share and consume high-quality data from responsibly, helping governments to enable measurement and achievement. of the SDGs.

We know there is a real opportunity for organizations and governments to use digital technology responsibly to do more with less, and to make more efficient and responsible use of scarce resources while building a more resilient foundation for the future. Microsoft looks forward to contributing to Secretary-General Guterres’ “Sustainable Development Goals wake-up call” as referenced in the UN talks on our joint agenda and working with the UN and other international organizations to continue to build a resilient base for the achievement of the SDGs and to pursue the implementation of ongoing commitments.

Tags: COVID-19, SDGs, Sustainable Development Goals, United Nations Affairs Team, United Nations General Assembly, UNGA, UNIO, United Nations

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Disney CEO lays out early plan for digital future https://bizimkasa.com/disney-ceo-lays-out-early-plan-for-digital-future/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 23:53:00 +0000 https://bizimkasa.com/disney-ceo-lays-out-early-plan-for-digital-future/ Bob Chapek, CEO of Walt Disney Co, speaks during the 2022 Disney Legends Awards at Disney’s D23 Expo in Anaheim, California, U.S., September 9, 2022. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni/File Photo Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register Sep 11 (Reuters) – Walt Disney Co on Sunday sketched out the outlines of a plan for how […]]]>

Bob Chapek, CEO of Walt Disney Co, speaks during the 2022 Disney Legends Awards at Disney’s D23 Expo in Anaheim, California, U.S., September 9, 2022. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni/File Photo

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Sep 11 (Reuters) – Walt Disney Co on Sunday sketched out the outlines of a plan for how the entertainment, theme park and consumer products conglomerate will use technology to improve storytelling during of the next 100 years.

Speaking backstage at the company’s biennial D23 Expo fan convention with Reuters, chief executive Bob Chapek went to great lengths to avoid what he called the “M-word” or metaverse, although pushed the company in this direction last year.

Chapek described Disney’s vision for the Metaverse as “next-gen storytelling.” It wants to use data gathered from theme park visits and consumer streaming habits to deliver personalized entertainment experiences, including at the company’s Marvel and Lucasfilm studios.

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“Disney is absolutely a lifestyle,” he told Reuters on Sunday in an interview at the convention in Anaheim, California. “The question is how does our next-gen storytelling leverage what we know of a guest only into this Disney lifestyle, and then deliver unique experiences.”

Entertainment and tech companies have raced to secure a position in the metaverse after Meta Platforms Inc (META.O) CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that his company’s future would be dedicated to creating a robust, three-dimensional, and persistent environment where users’ digital avatars would work, hang out, and pursue their hobbies.

Long before Meta’s announcement, Chapek, who oversaw the parks division before taking the top job in 2020, spent years planning how to extend the theme park experience to people who will never visit the park. one of the company’s six theme parks worldwide.

Disney has begun laying the groundwork for exploring new forms of storytelling in earnest over the past year, appointing veteran media and technology executive Mike White to oversee the new Next Generation Storytelling and Consumer Experiences unit. .

White has been tasked with assembling the technology toolkit that Disney’s creative executives will be able to use.

He also brainstormed ideas for using augmented reality and other technologies to bring a new dimension to storytelling. Chapek cited an early example – an eight-minute augmented reality film that premiered this week on Disney+.

“That could be a really big catalyst for what’s going to show up there and, you know, five to 10 years from now,” Chapek said.

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Reporting by Dawn Chmielewski in Anaheim; edited by Kenneth Li and Stephen Coates

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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